Peace and joy: Children lead peace-building play date

Bangladeshi children living on the edge of the world’s largest refugee camp met their Rohingya peers�many for the first time�during an innovative play date held on Human Rights Day.

Almost 200 Bangladeshi students from several primary schools and madrasas teamed up with Rohingya children from eight World Vision learning centres for a fun day of games, sports, an art competition and a discussion on child marriage, including girls and boys. The event was organized by some of the 5,000 refugee children and adolescents who participate in 38 World Vision Peace Building Clubs in the camps.

The goal was to nurture understanding and ease tension between the two communities. Local residents have suffered economically as wages fall and prices rise following the influx of 1 million refugees two years ago.

They now compete with refugees for casual labour jobs and natural resources. Children from both groups have been injured in fights over precious firewood.

The day was a tremendous success and we hope that it’s the first of many, says James Kamira, Child Protection and Education Lead.

Breaking News

Response re-declared as CATIII Sustained Humanitarian Response

The Rohingya Refugee Response has been renamed and re-declared as a CATIII Sustained Humanitarian Response, following an announcement on 16 December by Cherian Thomas, Regional Leader, South Asia-Pacific.

An estimated 1 million Rohingya people continue to reside in the world’s largest refugee camp more than two years after violence drove them from Myanmar. To meet the emergency and development needs of both refugee and host communities, World Vision has established a Cox’s Bazar District Special Zone. Headed by Response Director Rachel Wolff, this innovative, efficient management structure will include grant-funded projects and two new Area Programmes.

Source: World Vision

Peace and joy: Children lead peace-building play date

Bangladeshi children living on the edge of the world’s largest refugee camp met their Rohingya peers�many for the first time�during an innovative play date held on Human Rights Day.

Almost 200 Bangladeshi students from several primary schools and madrasas teamed up with Rohingya children from eight World Vision learning centres for a fun day of games, sports, an art competition and a discussion on child marriage, including girls and boys. The event was organized by some of the 5,000 refugee children and adolescents who participate in 38 World Vision Peace Building Clubs in the camps.

The goal was to nurture understanding and ease tension between the two communities. Local residents have suffered economically as wages fall and prices rise following the influx of 1 million refugees two years ago.

They now compete with refugees for casual labour jobs and natural resources. Children from both groups have been injured in fights over precious firewood.

The day was a tremendous success and we hope that it’s the first of many, says James Kamira, Child Protection and Education Lead.

Breaking News

Response re-declared as CATIII Sustained Humanitarian Response

The Rohingya Refugee Response has been renamed and re-declared as a CATIII Sustained Humanitarian Response, following an announcement on 16 December by Cherian Thomas, Regional Leader, South Asia-Pacific.

An estimated 1 million Rohingya people continue to reside in the world’s largest refugee camp more than two years after violence drove them from Myanmar. To meet the emergency and development needs of both refugee and host communities, World Vision has established a Cox’s Bazar District Special Zone. Headed by Response Director Rachel Wolff, this innovative, efficient management structure will include grant-funded projects and two new Area Programmes.

Source: World Vision